JOIN THE CONVERSATION

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Recently the Office of Dean Learning and Teaching has been running a seminar series entitled A National Conversation on Learning and Teaching, in which national leaders have given presentations to RMIT staff about their work.

On October the 12th, 2016, Professor Richard James from the University of Melbourne presented about a project titled The Academic Workforce 2025 that was funded by the Australian Government's Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT).

During the presentation Professor James raised questions about what the professionalisation of the academic workforce might look like. This was informed by an analysis of how a 'profession' is recognised and reinforced in other disciplines and a subsequent observation that currently university teaching (and more holistically speaking, 'academic work') is not systematically recognised and reinforced via the common mechanisms adopted by other professions.

One of Professor James' main points, as outlined in the five minutes between 32:36 and 37:25 is that we "haven't reinvented the academic workforce for the present times".

In the spirit of continuing the 'national conversation' we encourage conference participants to watch some or all of Professor James' presentation and then respond to the discussion question either by leaving a comment below or a response to another comment.

The question posed is:

 

In order to better meet the combined needs of students, staff and the University as we move toward 2020, what are some of the things that you would like to see happen in relation to the academic workforce?

 

Recently the Office of Dean Learning and Teaching has been running a seminar series entitled A National Conversation on Learning and Teaching, in which national leaders have given presentations to RMIT staff about their work.

On October the 12th, 2016, Professor Richard James from the University of Melbourne presented about a project titled The Academic Workforce 2025 that was funded by the Australian Government's Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT).

During the presentation Professor James raised questions about what the professionalisation of the academic workforce might look like. This was informed by an analysis of how a 'profession' is recognised and reinforced in other disciplines and a subsequent observation that currently university teaching (and more holistically speaking, 'academic work') is not systematically recognised and reinforced via the common mechanisms adopted by other professions.

One of Professor James' main points, as outlined in the five minute segment between 32:36 and 37:25 is that we "haven't reinvented the academic workforce for the present times".

In the spirit of continuing the 'national conversation' we encourage conference participants to watch some or all of Professor James' presentation and then respond to the discussion question either by leaving a comment below or a response to another comment.

The question posed is:

 

In order to better meet the combined needs of students, staff and the University as we move toward 2020, what are some of the things that you would like to see happen in relation to the academic workforce?

 

Recently the Office of Dean Learning and Teaching has been running a seminar series entitled A National Conversation on Learning and Teaching, in which national leaders have given presentations to RMIT staff about their work.

On October the 12th, 2016, Professor Richard James from the University of Melbourne presented about a project titled The Academic Workforce 2025 that was funded by the Australian Government's Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT).

During the presentation Professor James raised questions about what the professionalisation of the academic workforce might look like. This was informed by an analysis of how a 'profession' is recognised and reinforced in other disciplines and a subsequent observation that currently university teaching (and more holistically speaking, 'academic work') is not systematically recognised and reinforced via the common mechanisms adopted by other professions.

One of Professor James' main points, as outlined in the five minute segment between 32:36 and 37:25 is that we "haven't reinvented the academic workforce for the present times".

In the spirit of continuing the 'national conversation' we encourage conference participants to watch some or all of Professor James' presentation and then respond to the discussion question either by leaving a comment below or a response to another comment.

The question posed is:

 

In order to better meet the combined needs of students, staff and the University as we move toward 2020, what are some of the things that you would like to see happen in relation to the academic workforce?

 

COMMENTS

Please be respectful and use at least your first name in the discussion.

COMMENTS

Please be respectful and use at least your first name in the discussion.

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